6 Quick Facts About the guideWELD® LIVE real welding guidance system

1. guideWELD® LIVE is NOT a simulator:

  • It is an actual welding helmet used while live welding and can be used in any welding booth
  • Trains how to consistently have proper work angle, travel angle, and correct welding speed while performing a live weld

2. Auto-darkening helmet, hand sensor & speed sensor work together to give feedback on proper welding technique
3. Improves welding technique development and increases welder confidence
4. Real-time corrective feedback in every welding booth for MIG & STICK
5. Feedback comes from 9 default WPS’s with customization available
6. Provides guidance on the proper welding technique of:

  • Speed
  • Work Angle
  • Travel Angle

For more information on the guideWELD® LIVE real welding guidance system check out the recording from our recent webinar:

Fall Webinar Schedule Announced

We’re excited to announce our fall webinar schedule!

Each fall and spring we offer a series of free webinars that revolve around the Career and Technical Education world. These sessions are presented by our product managers, product support team, and even some of our account managers get in on the fun.

If you see a webinar that you’re interested in, but can’t make the time or date, make sure to register for it anyways! We will send you a link to the recording along with any presentation materials once the webinar is complete.

Take a look at what we have planned for the fall so far:

What is the guideWELD LIVE real welding guidance system? – Sept. 12th @ 12pm
Learn More

RealCare Baby Boot Camp – Sept. 19th @ 11am
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Elevating your Family and Consumer Sciences Program by Incorporating RealCare Baby – Sept. 19th @ 12pm
Learn More

Getting Started with RealCare Baby – Oct. 3rd @ 11am
Learn More

Engaging Successful Learners Through Agriculture Education – Oct. 10th @ 3pm
Learn More

Shortcuts to Starting a CNA Pathway Program – Oct. 17th @ 12pm
Learn More

RealCare Baby Boot Camp – Oct. 18th @ 3pm
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Meet the Bovine Breeder artificial insemination simulator: A 15-Minute New Product Introduction – Oct. 22nd @ 11am
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Implementing the RealCareer Employability Program to Teach Soft Skills  – Oct. 30th @ 3pm
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Creating an engaging Gerontology pathway: The fundamentals you need to jump-start your own program – Nov. 15th @ 3pm
Learn More

Learn more today by checking out our webinar page, and while you’re there make sure to check out the archived sessions we have available to you as well!

Two Teachers Appointed to RealCare Advisory Council

Realityworks, Inc., is excited to welcome two new educators to our RealCare Customer Advisory Council. Northridge Middle School Family and Consumer Sciences (FACS) Teacher Cynthia Leonard and Catonsville High School FACS Teacher Christina DeSimone will bring over 22 years of experience using Realityworks’ RealCare Baby infant simulator to a council charged with guiding the popular teaching tool’s development, plus that of related learning aids and resources.

“RealCare Customer Advisory Council members play an integral role in our marketing and product development strategies. They truly help us shape the way our programs impact young people’s lives,” said RealCare Product Manager Denise Bodart. “The insight gained by educators like Cynthia Leonard and Christina DeSimone help ensure that our programs remain relevant. They help us continue providing the targeted learning opportunities today’s students need to develop job skills.”

Widely known as the “Robot Baby,” RealCare Baby is a programmable infant simulator that cries for care day and night, then tracks its caregiver’s responses. It is most often used in conjunction with curriculum and activities to teach middle and high school students about child care, infant safety, child development and teen pregnancy prevention.

An active member of AAFCS and former board member of MAFCS, DeSimone is a tireless advocate for FACS education who has grown her program from 55 students to 168 in the last 3 years. She currently teaches Child Development and related courses at Catonsville High School in Catonsville, MD.

Leonard began using RealCare Baby at Northridge Middle School in Crawfordsville, IN in 2004. Three years later Leonard, who holds a master’s degree in education and is a member of AAFCS and AAFCS Indiana, successfully petitioned the local healthcare community to award her 5 additional simulators, which she credits with helping lower the local high school’s teen pregnancy rate.

“I look forward to collaborating with other teachers around the US and hearing how their programs work,” said Leonard. “It will also be fun and an honor to work with others in the planning of products for the future.”

Realityworks established its RealCare Customer Advisory Council in 2012 to help make its programs even more beneficial to Career and Technical Education pathways. The council gives passionate customers and leading educators a voice in product development initiatives and the opportunity to provide valuable insight into best practices and marketing strategies for Baby and related learning aids. Members’ experience educating youth on these subjects is used to further guide and direct Realityworks’ product offerings.

For more information on Realityworks’ products and programs, visit http://realityworks.com/

How 3 Amazing Schools Are Preparing High School Kids for Health Science Careers

Note: This article was originally published by We Are Teachers on July 9, 2018. The entire article can be found here.

Health science careers make up more than half of the top 20 fastest-growing occupations nationwide. Projections show that the United States will need 5.6 million more healthcare workers by 2020. It’s no wonder that more high schools are offering programs to help prepare students for careers in the medical field. Here’s a look at three schools offering successful and innovative approaches to healthcare education.

Thomas Edison Career and Technical Education High School – Jamaica, New York

Thomas Edison CTE School has a long history of offering healthcare-related programs. It is the only school in New York City with a medical assisting program approved by the state education department. While the courses offered prepare the 2,100 students for various careers, the medical assisting program is extremely popular. Dr. Margaret Savitzky, a medical assisting instructor at the school, points to several key reasons why the program is so successful.

STUDENTS CAN LEAVE WITH CERTIFICATION.

After completing their course work at Thomas Edison CTE, students can take their exams and get hired. “The medical assisting program is a three-year program. It culminates in a certificate in medical assisting when students pass the national certification exam,” says Dr. Savitsky. “This gives students the unique opportunity to leave high school and begin working in the healthcare field.”

THE CURRICULUM IS COMPREHENSIVE.

There are layers of learning that need to occur before a student is ready for a health science career. And as students continue through the program, all those layers build upon each other and get increasingly advanced.

“As sophomores, students study more general topics. Courses cover the history of healthcare, healthcare law, anatomy and physiology, nutrition, and first aid,” explains Dr. Savitzky. “During their junior year, students focus on the clinical skills. And as seniors, they learn the administrative tasks that a medical assistant performs. These include appointment scheduling, patient reception, triaging, insurance-related tasks, as well as résumé writing and preparation for the national certification exams.”

“Students come back to visit. They tell me that the program gave them a very solid foundation to help them in their studies,” says Dr. Savitsky.

STUDENTS GET HANDS-ON EXPERIENCE.

In addition to book learning, the students regularly conduct activities that let them practice essential skills, such as vital sign measurements, venipuncture, capillary puncture, ECG testing, urinalysis, pediatric measurements and visual acuity testing, and pulmonary function testing.

Prior to completing the program, “students are offered the opportunity to participate in volunteer internships with local healthcare facilities to see healthcare practice in the real world,” says Dr. Savitzky. This allows students to fine-tune their areas of interest, get a glimpse into working in a health science career, and establish relationships with potential employers.

Click here to read the about the two other great programs that are helping to prepare their students for careers in Health Science.

For more information on the Health Science line from Realityworks, check out the video below:

Back to School Supply Drive

As a part of our yearly charitable giving and volunteer efforts, the employees at Realityworks recently took part in our annual Stuff the Bus competition. This yearly school supply drive pits the seven departments against one another in an effort to gather the most supplies for each team’s designated school. The teams get to choose which school their supplies are donated to, and are often able to choose a school that one or more of the team members’ children attend.

This year, the teams chose to support the following local elementary schools: Halmstad, Meadowview, Stillson, Altoona, Oaklawn, Lakeshore, and Ridgelawn.

The sales department took 1st place in this friendly competition. We’re all excited to take trips to the schools to drop of the supplies before the start of the year.

Charitable Giving as a Company Philosophy

Each year Realityworks employees get the opportunity to nominate organizations to receive contributions of volunteer hours or outright donations for program assistance.  Our community can look to us for support and assistance.  Additionally, employees are encouraged to participate in local organizations’ committees and directional boards as a way to better our community through service. We can’t wait to share more of these great opportunities with you!

 

Back to School with RealCare Baby

It’s Back to School time, which means it’s time to get RealCare Baby out of storage and ready for some new adventures! Here are some tips to get you started and back in the groove with your RealCare Baby program.

  1. Take the RealCare Program Health Assessment to learn how you can improve the health of your RealCare Program.
  2. Before deploying Baby each week, charge it overnight to ensure a full 7 day’s use.
  3. Number all accessories that come with each Baby to easily track parts.
  4. Review the many support resources available to you free on our website including:
  5. Give your students access to the RealCare Baby Guide app (available for iPhone and Android) so they can easily access “how-to” info, FAQs and video guides 24/7 to help them with their care experience.
  6. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest, LinkedIn and YouTube, for news, updates, free downloads, product support tips, etc.

For more back to school tips and tricks take a look at this video, which reviews Baby’s components, programming, report interpretation, curricula, product support resources and more.

Perkins Reauthorization Highlights

By Samantha Forehand, Realityworks Marketing Communications Manager

We have been diligently watching the Senate’s progress on reauthorizing the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act (Perkins). Passed by the Senate and the House just last week, the Strengthening Career and Technical Education for the 21st Century Act aims to improve Career and Technical Education (CTE). As it moves to the President’s desk, we wanted to help our educators stay informed on what this means to them.

Accountability is a key factor
The revised bill has a theme of accountability and data collection. It will have performance indicators for CTE students and will take current requirements up a notch. The bill aims to strengthen the accountability and may require states to meet minimum requirements for funding though the requirements are not exactly laid out yet.

Limited bureaucracy from Education Department
Previously the secretary of education could negotiate goals with each state for CTE program plans. With this new bill the secretary still must approve the plans, but no longer will be involved in the process of creating those plans.

Flexibility to support local economic needs
CTE aims to bolster the workforce and as we all know, each city and even state have different economic needs. The beauty of CTE is that industry representatives can work together with education leaders to identify the skills gap seen in the local economy and help craft school programs to ensure students can take on careers that are needed. Each area will have different requirements and the bill is flexible in that matter.

Incorporation of employability skills
Employability skills and soft skills have really been buzzwords for education the past years, and the mention of them in the bill comes as no surprise. These skills are key in the alignment of CTE and careers and can be incorporated into all programs of study. The revised bill includes the integration of technical skills with interpersonal and organizational skills, communication in the workplace and how to effectively work with others.

The bill is now sitting on the President’s desk and could be signed any day. Some of the above could change. Regardless of these factors that stand out to us, this is a very promising sign of how our nation truly supports CTE.

Looking for more information?  Check out the links below:

Customer Spotlight: Dove Healthcare Nursing Program

By Emily Kuhn, Realityworks Communications Specialist

Less than five minutes into my first conversation with Bobby Scanlon, it was clear to me that she is in the right profession.

A nursing educator at Dove Healthcare, a long-term care facility in western Wisconsin, Scanlon has spent over two decades teaching geriatrics and elder care to CNA and nursing students. A lot has changed since she first began teaching, from teaching tools and methods to students’ expectations, but Scanlon’s dedication has only grown – and as a result, she is helping to make a big impact on healthcare education.

Comprised of six skilled nursing facilities, four assisted living facilities and one rehabilitation company, Dove Healthcare serves almost 500 residents and patients every day. As a nursing educator, Scanlon’s job is to teach her CNA, CBRF and CPR students the skills they need to provide quality care. However, Scanlon takes it one step further. Case in point: The reason for my visit with Scanlon that day was to learn more about the unique ways she was using Realityworks’ RealCare™ Geriatric Simulator to help her students develop empathy and geriatric sensitivity, key soft skills for anyone working with elderly patients.

The Geriatric Simulator is a wearable sensitivity suit that enables users to experience a variety of age-related physical challenges, like stiff joints, decreased mobility, visual impairment and loss of sensation. The interactive nature of this learning aid stands in stark contrast against the lecture and textbook teaching methods Scanlon’s own nursing instructors used when she was a student. As Scanlon described her excitement over using the simulator for the first time, and how much she was enjoying finding new ways to incorporate this unique tool into her program, I found myself impressed by Scanlon’s willingness to present her students with a variety of learning opportunities.

Years of teaching have taught Scanlon that to be an effective 21st Century educator, adaptation is key. Embracing new technology and teaching styles can be daunting, but Scanlon has seen the benefits firsthand. Her classes feature a combination of teaching techniques, from traditional lectures and PowerPoint presentations to small group networking opportunities, one-on-one skills practice sessions and of course, interactive learning aids like the Geriatric Simulator.

Scanlon has always sought to teach her students empathy and compassion toward the elderly, sharing with me that she regularly emphasizes the interactions her students have with residents during clinicals. Of course, there’s nothing like experiencing a lesson for yourself, and that’s what Scanlon does with the Geriatric Simulator. Her students are challenged to complete basic daily tasks like turning the pages of a book, buttoning a shirt, sitting and standing while wearing the full suit, which includes a walker and visual impairment glasses. The experiences make an impact; I was able to observe a CNA class as they tried the suit, and statements of “Oh my gosh,” “Oh wow” and “I didn’t know this is what they felt like!” came from every student, along with many statements of understanding.

Those statements of understanding – those “aha” moments – are why Scanlon exposes her students to these types of learning experiences. Throughout our conversations, she repeatedly stated that her goal by the end of each class is to “pass on my passion for working with the elderly to my students.” Her dedication and passion for elder care will drive her continued success, and as she’s already observed, empower her students to positively impact the lives of the elderly as well.

What are you doing to create “aha” moments in your classroom? Share your ideas in the comments, then watch how Dove Healthcare students reacted to our Geriatric Simulator by watching this video.

It’s All About Experience: 5 Tips for Engaging Today’s Students in Elder Care from a Seasoned Nursing Educator

by Emily Kuhn, Communications Specialist for Realityworks, Inc.

Note: This article was originally published by the National Consortium for Health Science Education in their Spring newsletter. The entire article can be found here.

It’s been 25 years since Bobby Scanlon began teaching geriatrics, and to say that a lot has changed is an understatement. Twenty-first century learning aids and technology have transformed what today’s students expect to experience in a classroom. Tech-savvy and not afraid to question what they’re hearing or seeing, today’s students love to learn, but they aren’t afraid to ask “why.” What’s more, they crave hands-on, real-world learning opportunities.

For some educators, the idea of embracing new technology and teaching styles to provide such opportunities can be daunting. However, if there’s anything Scanlon has learned in almost three decades of teaching, it’s that adaptation is not only vital to be an effective 21st century educator, but it can truly help transform your students’ education — and help them be that much more successful in their careers.

“One of my goals by the end of each class is to pass on my passion for working with the elderly to my students,” said Scanlon, who is a nurse educator with Dove Healthcare in West Central Wisconsin. “If I’m able to get even three students from a class of 10 to stay in long-term care, then that’s three more people who can touch the lives of the elderly. So I’m always looking for new ways to present a topic to my students and get them excited about learning.”

True to her word, Scanlon regularly incorporates new ideas and teaching methods into the CNA, CBRF, and CPR courses she teaches for Dove, but there are a few strategies she now consistently uses to ensure her students are presented with a variety of learning opportunities – and that there is a balance. Click here to read the 5 tips Scanlon recommends for engaging today’s health science students in elder care.

For more information on Realityworks’  innovative tools for skill training for health science programs check out the video below and visit the Health Science page.

 

Customer Spotlight: Marana High School Welding Program

By Jamey McIntosh, Realityworks RealCareer Product Manager

“Ultimately, everything we do at school is an investment in our future. Our return on investment in CTE programs is extremely high.” – Dr. David Mandel, Principal, Marana High School, AZ

I recently had the privilege to walk into one of the top high school welding and manufacturing shops in Arizona. It was a privilege for many reasons (not just because it was 97 degrees outside and air-conditioned in the shop). It was a privilege because once I stepped into Marana High School Welding Instructor Kenton Webb’s welding shop, I knew there was something special about this program.

Located about 20 minutes northwest of downtown Tucson and about 5 minutes from Saguaro National Park, Webb’s welding program sees about 250 students go through the shop doors every year – an increase of almost 200 students from when Webb started the program almost a decade ago. In the last nine years, the program has come to be one of the premier high school welding shops in the state, which is why our team jumped at the opportunity to visit in person and learn how Webb utilizes Realityworkswelding training tools and others to engage his students and help them develop skills.

As we walked around Webb’s impressive shop for the first time, we asked him to tell us how the shop came to be. As Webb recalled expanding from a single small shop to two, securing the support of school administrators and funding from grants, etc., I found myself becoming more impressed – especially when he shared that he designed most of the shop’s layout himself, and his students built many of welding booths themselves.

Today, Webb uses a combination of simulators and other spark-free training tools along with live welding training tools to help his students become proficient.

First-year students use Realityworks’ guideWELD® VR welding simulator to hone basic welding skills, eventually moving on to using the guideWELD® LIVE real welding guidance system to understand proper welding techniques (and master bad habits). Finally, Webb lets students loose to weld without any guidance, challenging them to identify and assess their own welds using the RealCareer™ Weld Defects Kit.

What we saw and heard made Webb’s passion for educating clear. Webb knows that being able to help his students truly understand where an in-demand skill like welding could take them is key to engaging them in welding training, and the impact of that understanding was obvious with every student we spoke with. We talked with Kylie, a senior who, of her own accord, took a week-long underwater welding class during spring break. During our conversation, her excitement and pride in the skill Webb has helped her hone came through loud and clear. With every discussion we had, it became more and more obvious that Webb’s students saw welding not only as a skill, but a career.

Our visit happened to occur two days before Marana High School seniors graduated, so there was a palpable excitement in the air. When I asked a few of them of their post-graduation plans, I was struck by how confident they were – a trait I credit in part to the great work being done at Marana High School. These students had plans; they had summer jobs and post-secondary educational opportunities lined up. They were getting offers out of high school for well-paying jobs and they were being accepted at tech schools and colleges.

I had a chance to speak briefly with Marana High School Principal Dr. David Mandel. One of the statements he made stuck with me. He stated that no matter what each Marana High School educator is teaching, “all kids are career-bound,” and they take that very seriously. It’s clear to me that with hard work comes success, and with a passion for welding education and training, Marana High School and Kenton Webb are making a huge difference for welding education, and for each and every student that goes through his classroom.

Hear Webb’s students react to their welding experiences by watching the complete video.